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Radiant Diamond Custom Ring

We recently completed this gorgeous custom ring for a stunning 2.20 ct square radiant cut diamond. The ring is a three stone style with tapered baguette side stones. The style is timeless yet modern, with the classic design accenting the geometric modern diamond.

Custom Built Engagement for Radiant Diamond
Custom Built Engagement Ring for Radiant Diamond
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What are the Best Diamond Shapes for an Engagement Ring?

Certain diamond shapes and sizes look incredibly beautiful when paired with particular settings. Here are some of our favorite combinations of diamonds and rings to help you decide the best diamond shapes for your engagement ring:

Larger round brilliants:

If you budget allows, round diamonds .90 ct and above look exquisite in the Large French Cut Pave setting, R2834.

French Cut Diamond Pave Setting from Adiamor
French Cut Diamond Pave Setting from Adiamor

 

One of our favorite customizations of this ring is to add diamonds on the prongs for a very luxurious and romantic look. The diamonds in the gallery are visible to the wearer only, so it’s like a secret love note to your beloved.

For more petite round brilliant stones, such as .50 ct and below, the classic solitaire makes a charming counterpart.

Diamond Solitaire Engagment Ring from Adiamor
Diamond Solitaire Engagment Ring from Adiamor

 

Rectangular fancy shaped diamonds like Emerald cuts and elongated Radiants or Cushions look great in three stone rings. Some of Adiamor’s recent favorite custom rings have been rectangular fancy shapes in three stone rings with tapered baguette side stones.

Radiant Diamond Engagement Ring with Baguettes
Radiant Diamond Engagement Ring with Baguettes

Tip: If you are looking for a rectangular stone, make sure the length to width ratio is above 1.10. The most popular L:W ratios for emerald cuts are between 1.30-1.40, because this produces a rectangular shape. If you know you like a very long rectangle, feel free to go higher, though. Or, if you want a squarer rectangle, look for L:W ratios from 1.20-1.30. Any diamond with a L:W ratio below 1.05-1.08 (depending on cut) will appear as a square.

Later on, we’ll discuss halo engagement ring styles!

 

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Round Diamond in a Cushion-Shaped Halo Engagement Ring?

Yes! This beautiful halo setting is one of our newest additions to the website, and can accommodate both round and squarish cushion-cut diamonds beautifully.

Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with a Cushion Cut Diamond
Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with a Cushion Cut Diamond

R2940 immediately became an office and customer favorite. It features a delicate pave style with a classic, elegant look. One great benefit of this ring is that it makes all diamond shapes look fantastic. There are so many options for center stones, whether you love round brilliants, cushion cut diamonds, radiant cuts and more!

The original shape we created this ring for was a cushion cut diamond. We have also  made this ring for a round brilliant diamond with a round halo. It looked exquisite.

Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with Round Diamond from Adiamor
Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with Round Diamond from Adiamor

 

 

Another option for round brilliant diamonds is mounting one in the cushion halo. If you want the brilliance of a round but love the cushion shape, this is an ideal option, as you can see in the picture below.

What do you think? Would you put a round diamond in an engagement ring made for a Cushion cut diamond? Let us know in the comments!

Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with Cushion Cut Diamond in White Gold
Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with Cushion Cut Diamond in White Gold
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What are the Most Haunted Diamonds in the World? Part 1

The Koh-i-Noor Diamond
The Koh-i-Noor Diamond

In the spirit of the upcoming Halloween festivities, we thought a series on Haunted Diamonds would be fun. First in this series, the Curse of the Koh-i-Noor Diamond!

The history of the rulers who have owned the Koh-i-Noor diamond is filled with treachery, murder, torture and betrayal. The legend of the Koh-i-Noor stretches back thousands of years to its first mention in a Sanskrit writing nearly 5,000 years old. Its first authenticated mention was in 1306 when it was stolen from the Raja of Malwa, whose family had owned the astonishing 793 carat diamond for hundreds of years. Originally named Samantik Mani (Prince Among Diamonds), the Koh-i-Noor gained its infamous name from Persian general Nadir Shah in 1739. Supposedly he cried out, “Koh-i-Noor!” (‘Mountain of Light’) upon discovering the diamond hidden within the folds of the Mughal Emperor Mohammed Shah’s turban.

Hindu Curse

It is said that any man who has ever worn the Koh-i-Noor has fallen from power or suffered serious misfortune. The first recorded instance of the Curse of the Koh-i-Noor

General Nadir Shah
General Nadir Shah

involves Prince Humayun, who received the diamond and suffered with ill luck for the rest of his life. His heir, Sher Shah Suri, came into possession of the diamond and died shortly thereafter, the victim of cannon fire. Sher’s son, Jalal Khan inherited the Koh-i-Noor and was then murdered by his brother-in-law. Prince Humayun’s great grandson, Shah Jahan (builder of the great Taj Mahal) had the diamond mounted on the Peacock Throne, which was the Mughal throne of India. The Shah was betrayed and imprisoned by own his son. The legend tells that the Shah would only be able to see his beloved Taj Mahal by viewing its reflection in the diamond. His son, Aurangazeb then took the diamond to Lahore, where it stayed until 1739, when general Nadir Shah invaded India and claimed ownership of the diamond.

The historical origin of the Koh-i-Noor diamond is not certain. It was most likely originally mined in the Golconda mines of India, from which also issued the famous (and cursed) Hope Diamond. Eventually, the British Crown came into possession of the Koh-i-Noor after Ranjit Singh, the last Indian owner of the diamond, died. This was not a provision of Ranjit Singh’s will, and even at the time the secretive transfer of the diamond to the East India Company in

Queen Victoria wearing the Koh-i-Noor as a brooch
Queen Victoria wearing the Koh-i-Noor as a brooch

London caused controversy because it was seen more as an ill-gotten spoil of war rather than a true gift to the British Crown. The diamond was presented to Queen Victoria in July of 1850.  She wrote:  “The jewels are truly magnificent. They had also belonged to Ranjit Singh and had been found in the treasury of Lahore…. I am very happy that the British Crown will possess these jewels for I shall certainly make them Crown Jewels”. 

In the Great Exhibition in 1851 the Koh-i-Noor was displayed for the public. Crowds lined up to see it, but unfortunately the overall reaction was one of disappointment. The diamond was moved to a different case to catch more sunlight, but it still underwhelmed its viewers due to its rough rose cut. In 1852, Prince Albert had the diamond recut into a brilliant oval shape in order to improve its light performance and color. The Koh-i-Noor diamond is now 105.60 cts and is currently

The British Crown containing the Koh-i-Noor Diamond
The British Crown containing the Koh-i-Noor Diamond

set in the Crown of Queen Elizabeth. The Royal Family, perhaps themselves wary of the curse, have decreed that only the females of the family could inherit the diamond, and the Koh-i-Noor should only go to the wife of any male British heir. Today it remains part of Britain’s Crown Jewels, and may be viewed at its resting place in the infamous Tower of London.

Check back next time for more stories about Haunted Diamonds!

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Why Aren’t Fancy Shape Diamonds Given Cut Grades?

Of all the 4C’s, everyone can agree that it is Cut that has the most impact on a diamond’s sparkle, fire and brilliance- so why aren’t fancy shaped diamonds like the marquise, the cushion or the radiant shape graded on cut? The fact is that GIA only grades round brilliant diamonds and AGS grades both round and princess cuts; both of these well-known cut grades were only invented very recently- as in the 2000’s!

So why aren’t fancy shapes given a cut grade like rounds? Shouldn’t it be relatively easy to put together a comprehensive system for grading an oval as you would the round brilliant or a princess cut diamond- how hard could it be, right? Well the short answer is: Very.

Fancy diamond shapes are based off the two main faceting styles- brilliant and step cut faceting. This means there are nearly endless ways to modify the shapes to maximize light return, fire and scintillation by lengthening, shortening, adding or subtracting facets within the pavilion and crown of the gem. The diagrams below show just a few of the faceting variations the diamond cutter may employ to coax certain aspects out of the diamond rough when creating a cushion cut diamond shape:

Cushion Cut Diamond Faceting Styles
Cushion Cut Diamond Faceting Styles

Some of these faceting styles are meant to create the popular “crushed ice” look in which the diamond scintillates from all angles; the addition of the shorter facets in the pavilion actually causes light to reflect and refract back at the viewer at an accelerated rate. Other styles with more elongated facets are meant to emphasize the traditional Old Mine cut glimmer and higher rate of fire that is best shown off in candlelight.

Traditional Cushion Cut and "Crushed Ice" Cushion Cut Diamonds
Traditional Cushion Cut and “Crushed Ice” Cushion Cut Diamonds

All of them are gorgeous in their own way, but which has the better cut? It is true that beauty is in the eye of the beholder; one may prefer the fire and glimmer of the longer faceting style over the crushed ice and vice-versa, however we can agree that there are certain ideals to each shape to which the diamond cutter should strive.

Fire, brilliance, life- these attributes are all created according to set mathematical formula which determines the exact length and angles of the facets adjoining in perfect symmetry to ensure that light travels within the gem properly. This is the core of the issue- how to evaluate each diamond’s exact measurements, depth and crown angles to ensure that a diamond is ‘ideally cut’.

Adiamor has created (in conjuction with our diamond cutting partners and through decades of hands-on diamond experience) an easy to understand chart which details the Ideal through Good cut grades for each fancy diamond shape by determining a diamond’s depth and table percentages. Depth and table percentages are calculated by dividing the length of a diamond’s table or its total depth by its diameter; for example if a diamond’s total depth is 5.6mm and the diameter is 10.0mm, then its depth percentage is 56%. These mathematic formulas help us to be able to determine if a diamond will sparkle in an attractive manner, as they are loosely based upon the ideal brilliant cut faceting formula used for rounds which are graded. Combined with a diamond plot depicting the faceting style of the pavilion of the diamond, we are able to get a fairly good idea of how well a diamond has been cut.

Affinity Diamond Depth and Table Measurements
Affinity Diamond Depth and Table Measurements

As to why these fancy shapes aren’t officially graded by GIA and AGSL (among others) is simply that there are too many variations on each shape to keep up! Each year, there are new twists to a classic shape, evoking even more brilliance and beauty. However, expect this state to change in the future, as more and more people within the industry begin to agree upon particular parameters for table and depth percentages, length to width ratios and more, assigning a cut grade to these gems will become the norm.

For now, however, when shopping for fancy shape diamonds, just keep in mind that beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder! The general appearance of the diamond should attract the eye and it should have plenty of brilliance and fire; try to find diamonds that have at least Very Good Polish and Symmetry as this means that both the facets align properly and are crisply polished, with defined junctures that pass light from one area to another. Work with your jeweler or gemologist to establish which table and depth percentages will ensure that your diamond has been cut to proper proportions and keep an eye on the length to width ratios to keep the diamond’s shape within normal parameters. Above all, love the gem you buy!

Loose Adiamor Diamonds
Loose Adiamor Diamonds
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The Shape of a Diamond

While everyone can recognize a round cut diamond right off the bat (it is the most common cut for engagement rings and is considered the classic standard for diamond rings), you may not realize that there are actually several different cuts for your diamonds that may offer unique properties. For starters, your stone can be deep or shallow, but the proper proportions lie somewhere in the middle to ensure maximum brilliance. Then there are the different shapes of cut. Here are a few of the most popular cuts and what you can expect from them.

1. Round. As stated, this is the most traditional cut, mainly because it brings out the most brilliance and fire in your stone. It is also the most researched, so there are precise mathematical calculations to ensure proper depth and symmetry of the stone.

2. Princess. This cut is second to the round cut in both demand and brilliance. It is generally square in shape (although it can be closer to a rectangle), which makes it a nice alternative to round cut since it can still be more or less symmetrical. But because of the way it is cut, even mostly colorless stones may show a bit of color in the corners.

3. Emerald. These diamonds have a rectangular cut in the pavilion (the lower portion of the stone) that gives them a uniquely open table (the face of the stone). This makes it an excellent cut to showcase stones with particularly good clarity.

4. Marquise. The beauty of this cut is that it can make the best of a small carat in that it looks larger than other stones of the same weight. It is a good choice for women with long fingers because the dimensions highlight this attribute.

5. Heart. There is little to recommend this cut aside from the obvious symbolism it embodies. It has no edge over other cuts, although it may be less expensive.