r-1720.jpg

What are the Best Diamond Shapes for an Engagement Ring?

Certain diamond shapes and sizes look incredibly beautiful when paired with particular settings. Here are some of our favorite combinations of diamonds and rings to help you decide the best diamond shapes for your engagement ring:

Larger round brilliants:

If you budget allows, round diamonds .90 ct and above look exquisite in the Large French Cut Pave setting, R2834.

French Cut Diamond Pave Setting from Adiamor
French Cut Diamond Pave Setting from Adiamor

 

One of our favorite customizations of this ring is to add diamonds on the prongs for a very luxurious and romantic look. The diamonds in the gallery are visible to the wearer only, so it’s like a secret love note to your beloved.

For more petite round brilliant stones, such as .50 ct and below, the classic solitaire makes a charming counterpart.

Diamond Solitaire Engagment Ring from Adiamor
Diamond Solitaire Engagment Ring from Adiamor

 

Rectangular fancy shaped diamonds like Emerald cuts and elongated Radiants or Cushions look great in three stone rings. Some of Adiamor’s recent favorite custom rings have been rectangular fancy shapes in three stone rings with tapered baguette side stones.

Radiant Diamond Engagement Ring with Baguettes
Radiant Diamond Engagement Ring with Baguettes

Tip: If you are looking for a rectangular stone, make sure the length to width ratio is above 1.10. The most popular L:W ratios for emerald cuts are between 1.30-1.40, because this produces a rectangular shape. If you know you like a very long rectangle, feel free to go higher, though. Or, if you want a squarer rectangle, look for L:W ratios from 1.20-1.30. Any diamond with a L:W ratio below 1.05-1.08 (depending on cut) will appear as a square.

Later on, we’ll discuss halo engagement ring styles!

 

r-1720.jpg

Round Diamond in a Cushion-Shaped Halo Engagement Ring?

Yes! This beautiful halo setting is one of our newest additions to the website, and can accommodate both round and squarish cushion-cut diamonds beautifully.

Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with a Cushion Cut Diamond
Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with a Cushion Cut Diamond

R2940 immediately became an office and customer favorite. It features a delicate pave style with a classic, elegant look. One great benefit of this ring is that it makes all diamond shapes look fantastic. There are so many options for center stones, whether you love round brilliants, cushion cut diamonds, radiant cuts and more!

The original shape we created this ring for was a cushion cut diamond. We have also  made this ring for a round brilliant diamond with a round halo. It looked exquisite.

Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with Round Diamond from Adiamor
Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with Round Diamond from Adiamor

 

 

Another option for round brilliant diamonds is mounting one in the cushion halo. If you want the brilliance of a round but love the cushion shape, this is an ideal option, as you can see in the picture below.

What do you think? Would you put a round diamond in an engagement ring made for a Cushion cut diamond? Let us know in the comments!

Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with Cushion Cut Diamond in White Gold
Diamond Halo Engagement Ring with Cushion Cut Diamond in White Gold
r-1720.jpg

Why Aren’t Fancy Shape Diamonds Given Cut Grades?

Of all the 4C’s, everyone can agree that it is Cut that has the most impact on a diamond’s sparkle, fire and brilliance- so why aren’t fancy shaped diamonds like the marquise, the cushion or the radiant shape graded on cut? The fact is that GIA only grades round brilliant diamonds and AGS grades both round and princess cuts; both of these well-known cut grades were only invented very recently- as in the 2000’s!

So why aren’t fancy shapes given a cut grade like rounds? Shouldn’t it be relatively easy to put together a comprehensive system for grading an oval as you would the round brilliant or a princess cut diamond- how hard could it be, right? Well the short answer is: Very.

Fancy diamond shapes are based off the two main faceting styles- brilliant and step cut faceting. This means there are nearly endless ways to modify the shapes to maximize light return, fire and scintillation by lengthening, shortening, adding or subtracting facets within the pavilion and crown of the gem. The diagrams below show just a few of the faceting variations the diamond cutter may employ to coax certain aspects out of the diamond rough when creating a cushion cut diamond shape:

Cushion Cut Diamond Faceting Styles
Cushion Cut Diamond Faceting Styles

Some of these faceting styles are meant to create the popular “crushed ice” look in which the diamond scintillates from all angles; the addition of the shorter facets in the pavilion actually causes light to reflect and refract back at the viewer at an accelerated rate. Other styles with more elongated facets are meant to emphasize the traditional Old Mine cut glimmer and higher rate of fire that is best shown off in candlelight.

Traditional Cushion Cut and "Crushed Ice" Cushion Cut Diamonds
Traditional Cushion Cut and “Crushed Ice” Cushion Cut Diamonds

All of them are gorgeous in their own way, but which has the better cut? It is true that beauty is in the eye of the beholder; one may prefer the fire and glimmer of the longer faceting style over the crushed ice and vice-versa, however we can agree that there are certain ideals to each shape to which the diamond cutter should strive.

Fire, brilliance, life- these attributes are all created according to set mathematical formula which determines the exact length and angles of the facets adjoining in perfect symmetry to ensure that light travels within the gem properly. This is the core of the issue- how to evaluate each diamond’s exact measurements, depth and crown angles to ensure that a diamond is ‘ideally cut’.

Adiamor has created (in conjuction with our diamond cutting partners and through decades of hands-on diamond experience) an easy to understand chart which details the Ideal through Good cut grades for each fancy diamond shape by determining a diamond’s depth and table percentages. Depth and table percentages are calculated by dividing the length of a diamond’s table or its total depth by its diameter; for example if a diamond’s total depth is 5.6mm and the diameter is 10.0mm, then its depth percentage is 56%. These mathematic formulas help us to be able to determine if a diamond will sparkle in an attractive manner, as they are loosely based upon the ideal brilliant cut faceting formula used for rounds which are graded. Combined with a diamond plot depicting the faceting style of the pavilion of the diamond, we are able to get a fairly good idea of how well a diamond has been cut.

Affinity Diamond Depth and Table Measurements
Affinity Diamond Depth and Table Measurements

As to why these fancy shapes aren’t officially graded by GIA and AGSL (among others) is simply that there are too many variations on each shape to keep up! Each year, there are new twists to a classic shape, evoking even more brilliance and beauty. However, expect this state to change in the future, as more and more people within the industry begin to agree upon particular parameters for table and depth percentages, length to width ratios and more, assigning a cut grade to these gems will become the norm.

For now, however, when shopping for fancy shape diamonds, just keep in mind that beauty is indeed in the eye of the beholder! The general appearance of the diamond should attract the eye and it should have plenty of brilliance and fire; try to find diamonds that have at least Very Good Polish and Symmetry as this means that both the facets align properly and are crisply polished, with defined junctures that pass light from one area to another. Work with your jeweler or gemologist to establish which table and depth percentages will ensure that your diamond has been cut to proper proportions and keep an eye on the length to width ratios to keep the diamond’s shape within normal parameters. Above all, love the gem you buy!

Loose Adiamor Diamonds
Loose Adiamor Diamonds
r-1720.jpg

Famous “Two-Ring” Proposals

Sometimes it’s fun to picture yourself as the leading lady in famous romances, like Guinevere and Lancelot, or Romeo and Juliet. While we don’t have any historical evidence for those legendary couples, we do have quite a few details about some famous ladies and their beaus, like Audrey Hepburn, Grace Kelly, and Lucille Ball. Though their romances are varied, they all share one thing in common: each woman received two engagement rings!

rosegoldengagementThe love affair between Audrey Hepburn and Mel Ferrer was a scorching one, culminating in a proposal in 1954. Audrey met Mel at a party, and it was love at first sight. They worked together in the stage production Ondine, in which Audrey played a water sprite. She certainly worked her fairy magic on Mel, because when he popped the question, he gave Audrey not just one, but two rings; one rose gold engagement ring and one in white gold. Knowing the starlet’s affinity for fashion, he wanted her to be able to wear his ring always and still have it match her outfit and other jewelry selections.

emerlandengagementringGrace Kelly’s sweetheart, Prince Rainier III of Monaco, also purchased two rings; though he went a little more over the top than Mel Ferrer. Originally, the Prince proposed to Grace with an engagement ring set with stones matching the colors of Monaco. Once he arrived in the States in 1956 and saw that traditional American engagement rings usually involved a diamond setting, he realized his faux pas. He immediately commissioned a 12-carat emerald cut diamond. Grace didn’t seem to mind either ring.  She was the picture of happiness when she sailed with her charming prince on a private luxury liner to their secret wedding location.

cushioncutengagementringsPerhaps the most romantic two-ring engagement story to come out of this era is the proposal between Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz. When the couple eloped in 1940, Desi proposed with a cheap brass ring (the type that turns your finger green after just a few hours of wear), because all the high-end stores were closed. Later, he gave her the cushion cut diamond engagement ring they picked out together. Lucy said that she treasured the cheap brass ring for years, keeping it tucked away in her jewelry box next to other priceless jewels. She even wore it in dozens of episodes of I Love Lucy.

Even though these stories are thrilling, your man doesn’t have to buy you two engagement rings, or one with a whopping price tag. Like Lucy’s finger-tinting brass ring, it’s the love that doubles the worth of any proposal.  Find the ring, or rings, that exhibit your undying love, like this sparkling rose gold ring, only at Adiamor!

r-1720.jpg

Cushion Cut Engagement Rings: A Vintage Look You’ll Love

Cushion cut engagement rings are perfect for the woman that wants a vintage look. Also referred to as the “antique cut” these diamonds get their name due to their resemblance to an overstuffed seat cushion. Their puffy appearance give them a softer feel than other diamond cuts and they have 60 facets as opposed to other cuts that traditionally have 80. Cushion cut diamonds have rounded corners and they are square in shape. The cut is similar to emerald, princess, and oval cut diamonds. The cushion cut became popular before the invention of electric bulbs and was referred to as the “candlelight diamond” because of their brilliance when viewed by candlelight.

Cushion cut engagement rings will set you apart from the crowd. They are somewhat harder to come by in jewelry stores and many people find them at antique stores or estate sales.

If you are on the fence about purchasing a cushion cut engagement ring, here are some facts that might help.

* Cushion cut diamonds are softer and less geometric so they have a more romantic feeling to them.
* Cushion cut engagement rings will certainly set you apart from the crowd. They are unique and are also harder to find.
* Flaws on a cushion cut diamond are more prominent because there are less facets so you should conduct a very thorough check for inclusions and blemishes before you make your purchase.
* Because cushion cut diamonds have 20 less facets than other diamond cuts, they will not reflect and retract light as easily and this leads to less brilliance and sparkle.