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History of Art Deco Jewelry Designs, Part 2

The history of art deco jewelry designs is filled with classic inspiration and contemporary style. But, where did the name ‘Art Deco’ come from?

Several events happened during the 1920s that influenced fashion and jewelry design. In 1925 the Exposition Internationale des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes (In English, the International Exposition of Modern Industrial and Decorative Arts) was held in Paris. This event attracted artists of every variety to display their works, and drew immense crowds. The exposition showcased all the newest styles and art forms from across the world. The new style was geometric, linear, and often recalled classical styles in an updated way. The phrase “Art Deco” stemmed from the name of this exposition, and was given to this new style in the 1920s.

Paris Exposition Poster
Paris Exposition Poster

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The discovery of King Tut’s tomb in 1922 had a major impact on all aspects of design. Bold geometric lines and the use of gold and inlay work became very popular in jewelry after seeing the striking designs like inlaid lapis and gold in Tut’s tomb.  Motifs like the stylized human form and abstracted forms from nature were incorporated into many designs.

King Tut, Photograph by Kenneth Garrett, National Geographic Stock
King Tut, Photograph by Kenneth Garrett, National Geographic Stock

 

 

 

Palmolive Soap Ad, 1917, Image by Captain Geoffrey Spaulding, via Flickr
Palmolive Soap Ad, 1917, Image by Captain Geoffrey Spaulding, via Flickr

 

The advent of technology was another major influence on all aspects of design in the 1920s. Design such as the iconic Cartier Louis wristwatch were designed for the on-the-go timekeeping needs of aviators. Tennis and golf were popular for all genders, and sportier styles of clothes created the need for jewelry that would go with those clothes. Hefty brooches, delicate filigree, and multi-layered pearl chokers that looked appropriate with ruffled Edwardian blouses were now seemed far too old fashioned for the streamlined designs of the 1920s. Delicate platinum was still du jour, but in much more geometric lines.

Cartier Watch, Image Courtesy of Cartier.com
Cartier Watch, Image Courtesy of Cartier.com

www.cartier.us

Engagement rings were popular in the 1920s, but the diamond solitaire did not become the universal standard until a little bit later on in history. Diamond rings were popular, maybe set with three equal sized diamonds, and other gemstones were also a common choice for an engagement ring.

Art Deco 3-Stone Engagement Ring, Image Courtesy of laantiques.com
Art Deco 3-Stone Engagement Ring, Image Courtesy of laantiques.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For an enagement ring with geometric balance and detailing reminiscent of the Art Deco period with a timeless appeal, try this three stone pave setting R2557

3-Stone Diamond Engagement Ring with Pave Accents by Adiamor
3-Stone Diamond Engagement Ring with Pave Accents by Adiamor

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For some intricate pave set diamonds that would have made any artisan in the 1920s proud, take a look at this baguette and pave set ring: R2439

Emerald Cut Diamond Engagement Ring with Baguette Accents by Adiamor
Emerald Cut Diamond Engagement Ring with Baguette Accents by Adiamor

 

How did Art Deco decline in popularity?

(And for you Art Deco fans, why did it ever go away?!)

Check out the last installment, Art Deco #3 for the answers!

 

 

 

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History of Art Deco Jewelry Designs, Pt 1

The 1920s were a time of dramatic changes in many areas, including the styles of fashion and jewelry. The Art Nouveau movement, which was popular before Art Deco, focused on curving lines, delicate details and natural imagery. In jewelry, figures of women with fairy wings and images from nature were popular, as well as subtle, soft-looking stones such as moonstone and pearl. With the advent of Art Deco, these trends transformed into bolder, more geometric styles, while maintaining the attention to detail. Diamonds were often placed in combination with onyx for a sharp, black and white contrast, or colored gems like emeralds and rubies to form abstract designs.

Art Nouveau and Art Deco Jewelry Examples, Images Courtesy of Lang Antiques & Alson Jewelers
Art Nouveau and Art Deco Jewelry Examples, Images Courtesy of Lang Antiques & Alson Jewelers

These changes in Art Deco jewelry designs mirrored the changes in fashion. With women’s shorter haircuts and lower necklines, long earrings were the perfect accessories to fill up this newly empty space between hair and shoulders. Dresses were looser, with dropped waists and shorter hemlines.  Emphasis was on vertical lines from head to toe, and long necklaces accenting these long lines.

Pearls were very popular as a necklace choice, as well as a variety of gemstones. Women’s foreheads were no longer in styles, and were often covered by hair, tight-fitting cloche hats, and head pieces. This also gave jewelry designers the opportunity to create elaborate decorations for women’s hair, often with precious materials like platinum and diamonds.

Art Deco Bridal Hair Comb, Image Courtesy of One Wed
Art Deco Bridal Hair Comb, Image Courtesy of One Wed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This transformation of style from Art Nouveau to Art Deco was seen in rings, as well. Graceful elements inspired by natural motifs gave way to a more linear graphic style emphasizing the length of the hand. For some curved lines and pave details reminiscent of the Art Nouveau style, check out this ring:

Twisted Pave Halo Engagement Ring by Adiamor
Twisted Pave Halo Engagement Ring by Adiamor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For a bolder, more linear look, try this Art Deco-inspired ring.

Art Deco Inspired Asscher Cut Diamond Engagement Ring by Adiamor
Art Deco Inspired Asscher Cut Diamond Engagement Ring by Adiamor

 

 

Want to know how Art Deco got its name?

Curious how King Tut affected the styles of jewelry in the 1920s?

Stay tuned for the next installment, Art Deco Jewelry Designs Part 2: The Heyday.

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Top Engagement Ring Trends for 2010

Diamonds, like black, go with everything, but trends come and go. This year give her a setting that will stun her. Whether she has a sophisticated style from yester year or a hip modern style, these trends will provide inspiration for everyone!

Trend #1: Geometric Shapes

Are you ready to get in shape? A geometric shape that is! Trillions, Pears, and Heart-shaped stones are all making a comeback as eye-catching angles come back into style. Keep an eye out for vintage shapes as Rose, Marquise and Cushion cut stones are on the rise as well.

Trend #2: Diamonds All Around

If you are who you hang with, Pave is where it is at! The current styles are dripping in diamonds and have continued to be a huge success. Not only do these extra diamonds add more bling to your finger, but the can also make you center stone appear larger than its actual carat weight. Who doesn’t want more brilliance for their buck?

Trend #3: Trellis Band

New ring settings have been raising the bar, literally. From braids to basket weaves, dainty bows to elaborate molds, the trellis detail gives your ring an elegant level of intricacy. Whichever style you choose, let the elaborate metal detailing stand on its own, we love that it can be either complex or classic.

Trend #4: Two-Tone Metal

Rose, black, brown and green gold are all trendy new alloys of the metal you already love. Try mixing and matching metal alloys for a strikingly edgy look or stick to the classics, like rose and yellow gold, to give your ring stunning and elegant style.

Trend #5: Split Shank

The more the merrier, especially for split-shank engagement rings. Two track-like bands frame your diamond. From swirling diamond bands to streamlined metal twists, the split shank setting adds a sophisticated elegance to the finger.